SEO Writers: 3 Things I’ve Noticed about SEO Writing by Browsing Popular Job Outlets That Can Help You Earn More

Sometimes, I peruse the web looking for SEO writing jobs just to see what companies are paying, and what types of SEO writers are in-demand. I do this to stay “in the know,” so to speak. Following are three things that stood out to me that can help you earn more.

3 Things I’ve Noticed about SEO Writing Jobs by Browsing Popular Job Outlets

1. SEO Writing Rates are Increasing. While there are still ridiculous ads like, “I need 5 400-word articles that pass Copyscape in good English and I’m willing to pay $3 per article for the right writer”; they are becoming less common.

2. The Money Is In the Niche: All types of companies are looking for SEO writers. See the two job listings below for what I mean. And, if you’re lucky enough to specialize in a niche that a prospect’s business is in, you have a better shot at landing the gig.

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Yes, there’s still space in the SEO writing class in Jamaica. Hope to see you there.
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I always advise SEO writers to niche it. It’s just easier to build a business this way in my experience. And, once you get your foot in the door with a company, they’ll almost always use you to write other types of content – if they like your work.

3. Social Media Is PART of SEO Writing: Many companies are seeking SEO writers who know social media as well (aka social media writing). This increases your value, so it pays to integrate this service into your SEO writing business.

Following are the two SEO writing jobs I mentioned just above.

SEO Writing Jobs

SEO Real Estate Writer: Chicago-based real estate website specializing in distressed properties (eg, foreclosures, REOs, etc.) seeks part-time article writer to produce high quality articles regarding various topics on Local Real Estate Market as well producing high level newsletter and press release content.

Rate: $15 – $35 per article / $10 – $15 per blog

Chemical-Free Home Cleaning Company Seeks SEO Writer: We are an Evanston based award winning chemical free home cleaning company. We are looking for free-lance SEO copywriters for our website revision and future postings and blogs on Facebook and Twitter.

Rate: $15 – $35 per page / article depending on length.

Good luck on the hunt and have a great weekend.

Yuwanda
P.S. Remember, the deadline for the SEO writing class in Jamaica is approaching soon.

Learning SEO is about so much more than learning a new skill; it’s about changing (taking control of) your life! Proof? See average salary of SEO writers in graphic just below.

P.P.S.: Avoid freelance writing dry spells by making extra money as an affiliate marketer: Learn how to earn $50-$150/day online pretty seamlessly in the best-selling ebook, How to Make Money Placing Ads on Free Classified Ad Sites.

Copyright © 2013: All material on this site is copyright protected and cannot be reproduced in any manner whatsoever without the editor’s written consent (linking to is fine).

SEO Writers: How to Determine If a Client Will Pay — 8 Factors to Consider

Because I love you so and don’t want you to get your heart broken on this Valentine’s Day by dealing with shady clients who don’t pay, here’s my Valentine to you . . .

I’ve discussed non-paying clients on this blog before, but it’s an ongoing problem – one you can never go over too. I decided to write this post because in late January, I received the following email from an SEO writer who got burned by a non-paying client. She wrote:

Can I ask your help? About two months ago you had mentioned two places that were hiring freelance writers. I contacted the person (whose name I believe is [name/email address was given]).

He gave me a project of content writing for a security site with a total cost of $180. I delivered the project via email late December with no response. I’ve since tried four times (including through a Yahoo and Gmail account) to get in touch. Did I just get burned? I was hoping maybe my emails weren’t going through but now it looks like I’m just never going to get paid.

Any tips?

My Response

L-

See the info in this post on how to handle this: http://www.seowritingjobs.com/seo-writing-advice-on-clients-who-dont-pay/. Unfortunately, I think you probably have been burned, but the advice in the post will help you avoid this in the future.

{I then followed up with another email shortly thereafter}

L-:
 
FYI, there were two more installments in that series of what to do when a client doesn’t pay. Here they are. All can be found on this page: http://inkwelleditorial.com/a-freelance-writer-has-her-first-400-day-within-a-month-of-doing-this-how-she-did-it-%e2%80%93-and-you-can-too.
 
Seventh Update (October 26th):  Freelance Writing Advice for SEO Content Writers: What to Do When a Client Doesn’t Pay (But Keeps Promising to Do So)
 
Eighth Update (November 1):  Freelance Writing Advice for SEO Content Writers: What to Do When a Client Doesn’t Pay (But Keeps Promising to Do So), Part II
 
Ninth Update (November 16):  Freelance Writing Advice for SEO Content Writers: What to Do When a Client Doesn’t Pay (But Keeps Promising to Do So), Part III
 
Best,
-Y

She Responded

Thanks for your help! I love your weekly advice. I guess being burned once out over a hundred clients isn’t so bad. My own stupidity at fault!

My Response

Great attitude L- — which means your “burn” wasn’t so bad and you’ll do fine moving forward. Glad you find my weekly advice helpful.
 
Best
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Freelance SEO Writers: 8 Things to Do to Lessen Your Chances of Getting Burned on Payment by a Client

I always like to remind freelance writers that this is rare. I’ve never been burned by an SEO writing client – ever. I have had a couple where it took some arm twisting to get paid – but again, in the six years I’ve been writing SEO content, I’ve never had a client NOT pay.

So, relax your mind on that score.

That being said, here are eight things you can do to increase your chance of weeding out non-paying SEO content writing clients.

1. Get an Initial Deposit: At my SEO writing company, we require a 50% upfront deposit from clients – especially new ones. In my opinion, this has become somewhat of an industry norm.

It can be tempting to forego this rule, particularly when the project is “small” (whatever that means to you) because your thinking usually goes something like, “I’ll go ahead and knock this out for you (eg, the 1, 3 or 5 articles in a day) and I’ll invoice you when I send it over.”

Not!

I don’t care how “small” the project is – get a deposit up front. And, if a prospect balks at this – don’t work with them because that’s a real red flag.

2. Google Them: Look for evidence of a “real” business – eg, website that’s been live for a few years, testimonials from clients they’ve worked with, presence on social media sites. If you do business online these days, you’re going to have what I call a “web footprint.”

Use this to your advantage.

Googling Client Tips: One thing I do if an email is coming from a generic source (eg, a non-company identifying source like @gmail.com, @hotmail.com, etc.) is google the specific email address. You’d be amazed at what will pop up when you search by a specific like this.

For example, when I first started visiting Jamaica a lot, one time I was looking for an apartment to rent on the beach for a month. I started getting all these emails. So to source them, I googled the email addresses. A lot of them were listed on apartment rental scam sites (criminals are so stupid sometimes). Of course, I weeded those right out.

So use the web, it can be your best friend when trying to protect yourself from content thieves.

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Get the latest info on the SEO writing class in Jamaica, ie, how does the live version of the class differ from the online version.
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3. Bulk Orders: What I mean by this is, if a prospect contacts you out of the blue and wants a bulk order (eg, 7, 10, 15 articles) and they want it quickly, this is a red flag.

The reason is, most legitimate clients want to test you out first. So, they may order a few articles (2, 3 or 4), but they’re highly unlikely to order 5, 10 or 15 articles at once – unless they’ve worked with you before.

When I first started my SEO writing career, I once had a prospect try to order 40 articles. I thought it was strange, but I was elated at the same time. When I asked for the initial 50% deposit up front, I never heard from them again.

4. Use an SEO Writing Contract: FYI, this is a scare tactic. While would-be thieves probably won’t adhere to one even if they do sign it, at least they’ll get a heads-up that you’re serious about your business and have a legal leg to stand on if they don’t pay.

In fact, when you ask them to sign one, they likely to just scuttlebutt on to the next potential victim than deal with your SEO writing company.

Note: SEO Writing Contract Ebook — FYI, I’ve finished an SEO writing contract ebook (aka SEO Letter of Agreement). It details 10 things you should cover in your contract to help you get paid for every job you do. It’ll be available later today or tomorrow. I’ll post a link here when it’s live.

Update 2/15/2013 — Ebook has been uploaded!

5. Providing Writing Samples Up Front: Learn more about what I call “the writing sample scam.” If a prospect displays any of this type of behavior, avoid them like the plague.

6. Ask for References: This is particularly true if it’s a large job and you haven’t worked with this prospect before.

7. Change Your Payment Policies: One SEO writer who had problems getting paid from a client once said she was thinking of changing her payment policy to getting 100% up front, instead of the 50% she now received.

While I don’t advise this (the reason is outlined in the link), I do advise doing something like what another freelance SEO writer I correspond with regularly did. Her rates were low — $20 for 400 word articles. She’d get clients who’d place one order at a time and would lament that “it wasn’t even worth turning her computer on for.”

I always advised her to raise her rates. But, as SEO writing was not her primary business, what she did was to implement a “minimum project” rate. Her article order was a minimum of $100. So even if a client ordered one article at a time at $20/per, they still had to pay the minimum of $100 up front – and they’d just have a balance on HER books.

So instead of them owing her money, she owed them articles. In essence, she got pre-paid for her work.

8. Trust Your Gut: Sometimes something just will not sit right in your gut. You may not be able to pin point it, but it’s just . . . there.

Don’t ignore this. I’ve said this before, but it bears repeating – your gut will rarely lead you wrong. So if something just doesn’t feel right with a job – unless you get 100% payment up front (and it’s cleared and you’ve transferred it to your bank account), then trust the feeling.

Related Post

SEO Copywriting Advice: What Payment Methods to Expect/Accept from Clients & How/When to Raise Rates without Losing Clients

As always, here’s hoping you find this insight useful. Now, your turn . . .

SEO Writers: Share Your Thoughts on How to Ensure that You Get Paid

Have any tips you can pass along to avoid non-paying clients? Gotten burned writing content for a client? What did you do to get paid? Or, did you NOT get paid? Please share in the comments section below.

And, Happy Valentine’s Day! ♥
Yuwanda
P.S.: Earn $250+/Day Writing Simple Web Content? Here’s the blueprint I used to start my SEO writing career.

P.P.S.: Don’t Know a Thing about SEO but Want to Start this Recession-Proof Career? Get SEO Copywriter Training.

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Submit a Guest Post: This site and its parent site, InkwellEditorial.com, now accept guest posts. Get the guest post submission guidelines.

Want to avoid freelance writing dry spells by making extra money as an affiliate marketer? Learn how to earn $50-$150/day online pretty seamlessly in the best-selling ebook, How to Make Money Placing Ads on Free Classified Ad Sites.

Copyright © 2013: All material on this site is copyright protected and cannot be reproduced in any manner whatsoever without the publisher’s written consent (linking to is fine). Violators will be prosecuted.

Question about the SEO Writing Class in Jamaica from a Facebook Fan

 Question about the SEO writing class in Jamaica from a Facebook fan. He wrote:

Just enquiring about your SEO training course in Jamaica – are there vacancies still available?

You have an ebook on SEO copy writing – does some of this material merge?

What’s the difference between the Ecourse and the live training in Jamaica? I may be interested in joining up, but Jamaica would be an addition expense from here in Ireland 🙂

See my answers on the Jamaica SEO writing class page (under the “Questions about the SEO Writing Class in Jamaica” heading).

Additional Questions: If you have additional questions, you can always email me [info-at-InkwellEditorial.com]. As I get a lot of email, put “SEO Jamaica” in subject line so I can find your inquiry in my Inbox quickly.

See you in paradise!
Yuwanda
P.S.: Remember, learning SEO is about so much more than learning a new skill; it’s about changing (taking control of) your life — financially and otherwise!
seo-copywriting-training

SEO Writers: 3 Things I Do to Land High-Paying Clients (and More Insight on Working with Them)

In the comments section of the post, SEO Writers: How Many Articles Can You Realistically Expect to Write in One Day? Why It’s Important to Know, a hearty little exchange took place between me and a couple of other SEO writers. It inspired my comment:

When I raised mine from $25 to $35/$45, I did lose clients, but my income remained consistent, even though I had to market more to find those higher-paying clients.  

But again, moving into another “tier” of client paid off handsomely — via referrals and the type of work my firm was hired to do. For example, these types of clients tend to be more likely to hire us to do more in-depth projects like rewriting an entire website, or producing special reports.

Hmm. . . this just inspired an idea for a new post …

So, here we are.

Getting SEO Writing Jobs: 3 Reasons It Pays to Raise Your Rates to Attract Higher-Paying Clients

I just wanted to expand upon the above comment a bit; explaining by way of an actual example. 

I. Higher-Paying Clients Mean Bigger Invoices / More Work: At the beginning of this year, I raised my firm’s SEO writing rates; now charging on average of $85 per article. Just this past Tuesday, one new client who signed on for our once a week article package at the beginning of the year ordered an ebook she’s going to use to market her success coaching business.

It’s a small ebook – only about a dozen pages – and will cost around $750.

This new client didn’t even flinch at the $85/per article rate. And, she’s so pleased with our article writing that she’s ordered another product (the ebook). We also do article submission for her, making the average order from her $100 per SEO article.

Why is all of this important? Because it illustrates my point about higher-paying clients being “more likely to hire you to do more in-depth projects like . . . producing special reports [ebooks].” 

II. Birds of a Feather Flock Together: What I mean by this is — clients of a certain ilk tend to network with each other. So if they refer you, they’ll likely be referring higher-paying clients as well.

This same client illustrates this point as well. On Wed, 30 Jan 2013, she emailed me the following:

I also have referred you to a few people at a conference I was at last week. 🙂 

If she was at a conference, she was likely at one with her peers – those she’s selling her services to. So, if she can afford $100 per article, it’s natural to assume that her peers and clients can afford this as well (or more). 

See what I mean?

III. No Muss / No Fuss: I’ve been freelancing since 1993 – and I can tell you from first-hand experience that most higher-paying clients are so much more low maintenance than lower-paying ones.

I asked this particular client for a litany of things for her ebook. She responded, saying, “I’ll get it to you in a couple of days.” And, boom – two days later – an email chock full of everything I’d asked for was in my inbox.

RE the weekly articles we write for her — when she first signed on, I told her that we’d upload a new one to her EzineArticles account every Monday. And of course, we do. But, has she emailed one time asking about it? Nope.

She forwarded us her keywords when she first ordered and gave us free reign as to topic matter. Has she commented on any article, eg, can you change this, don’t say that, link out to this? For the most part, nope.

On one occasion, she asked us to change the link in a resource box, but in 5 weeks – other than to say she loves the articles – she hasn’t said a peep and has been a dream to work with.

I think it’s because clients like this are busy running their business – so they don’t have time to micro-manage someone else. In fact, it’s one of the reasons they hire freelancers – so they can outsource it and forget it.

As someone who outsources stuff like web design, I know this is why I do it. I pay my web designer, give him a deadline, answer any questions he has — and leave him alone to get the work done. The only time I’ll contact him is when it’s done and I need changes tweaked, or if he misses a deadline (he almost never does). It’s cuz I’m busy — I simply don’t have time to check up on him.

Before I’d continue to do business with someone I had to constantly check up on, I’d fire them. And I think this is a mindset among high-paying, busy clients. Time is money — and they don’t pay people to waste theirs. They pay them to get stuff done. 

3 Things I Do to Attract High-Paying Freelance / SEO Writing Clients

1. Emphasize time: As in, I remind clients that by outsourcing their web content needs to us, they have more time to focus on what they do best.

2. Emphasize professionalism: I have a background in editorial, so emphasize the professionalism of the copy my firm’s clients can expect, as well as the fact that we “never miss a deadline.”

This alleviates worry and stress for them, which makes them more likely to hire us.

3. Ask a lot of questions up front: While this may seem counter-intuitive, it’s not. Why? Because the more info you get up front from them, the less you’ll have to do the back-and-forth dance later. They appreciate this. I explain up front that this is one of the main reasons we ask a lot of questions up front.

On a personal note . . . 

I didn’t make new freelance writing goals this year because I was feeling burnt out – and just plain ole lazy. I lost my work mojo!

Now it’s back though – in full force. I feel like I’ve written 50,000 words already this week alone! I’ve been writing, writing, writing – on my own ebooks, on client projects, guest posts, articles for my article marketing directory and newsletters. It’s been full steam ahead – and the results in my bank account are proof that hard work – literally – pays off.

How’s your year going so far? Please share in the comments section below.

Yuwanda

P.S.: Avoid freelance writing dry spells by making extra money as an affiliate marketer: Learn how to earn $50-$150/day online pretty seamlessly in the best-selling ebook, How to Make Money Placing Ads on Free Classified Ad Sites.

Copyright © 2013: All material on this site is copyright protected and cannot be reproduced in any manner whatsoever without the editor’s written consent (linking to is fine).

Freelance Writing Job: $20-$50 Per Article

Legal Writer Wanted

Requirements: We are looking for a legal writer who has had experience as an attorney or a paralegal. The site is for a worker’s comp firm, and we are looking for someone with knowledge and experience with this industry.

Start Date / Number of Articles: We have an immediate need for this person, and are looking for 4-6 pieces of content per week.

Rate of Pay: For past projects we have paid $20-$50 for each piece of content, depending on length and complexity. We are willing to work with the right person, and pay promptly.

How to Apply: Send writing samples (preferably legal) to cvos@yahoo.com.

Note: Please do not contact SeoWritingJobs.comabout job listings as we have no additional info over and beyond what’s listed here. Apply directly to the company via the info provided in the ad. And good luck!

Things to Keep in Mind When Applying for Freelance Writing Jobs Online

Note: Most clients you do business with are ethical. I’ve been “stiffed” in my freelance writing career exactly one time — years and years ago (I’ve been freelancing since 1993). So just know that going in. But as content marketing grows, so will unethical operators. The following posts give some insight into how to protect yourself as a freelance / online writer.

How to Protect Your Writing Samples & Guidelines on What Exactly Are the Responsibilities of an SEO Writer

What to Do When a Client Doesn’t Pay

POST SEO WRITING JOB ADS FREE

We post SEO writing jobs (and social media jobs, internet marketing jobs and all types of freelance writing jobs) free. Simply send your ad to info[at]SeoWritingJobs.com (Put “SEO Job Listing” in the Subject line). We will list it here, and in our weekly Seo Writing Jobs newsletter, which usually comes out on Wednesday.

Yuwanda
P.S.: Ready to start earning $50,000 to $75,000/year as an SEO content writer?

Register for the SEO copywriter training class. A nominal deposit reserves your spot. Learning SEO is about so much more than learning a new skill; it’s about changing (taking control of) your life! Proof? See average salary of SEO writers in graphic just below.

P.P.S.: Avoid freelance writing dry spells by making extra money as an affiliate marketer: Learn how to earn $50-$150/day online pretty seamlessly in the best-selling ebook, How to Make Money Placing Ads on Free Classified Ad Sites.

Copyright © 2013: All material on this site is copyright protected and cannot be reproduced in any manner whatsoever without the editor’s written consent (linking to is fine).