SEO Content Writing Advice on When to Turn Down a Job — You Won’t Believe What This Client Wanted & What They Proposed to Pay

Here we go again with the what I call “We have lots of work for you if you’ll just work for x” SEO writing jobs hook. The reason I refer to it as a hook is so many new article writers fall for this – or are tempted to.

The following email I received from a new SEO writer a couple of weeks ago (on 3/14) illustrates this perfectly. It was a long email. She wrote, in part:

Hello,

A client contacted me and asked me to write 1000 word articles for his clients. I wanted to get your opinion. He claims that he has plenty of work for me. Do you think it is worth working with this client?  Here is what he sent me: 

I hope this letter finds you in good spirits.  We’re happy to have you join our team!  We are overwhelmed with orders and need all the help we can get right now. 

One of the things we also do for clients is create “SEO Articles” to increase traffic at the web site.  In this project you are requested to write a 1000+ word article . . . and embed at least 10 SEO keywords.  One of the ways we promote our clients is by reviewing a few complementary businesses.  A complementary business partner is a similar business, but not directly competing.

For example, a realtor and a mortgage broker are complementary businesses because they are both speaking to the same target market, but they are not directly competing with each other.  The goal with this assignment is to review 4 complementary business partners and alert the press about the blog.  

This strategy is broken into 4 parts: 

Phase 1 ($25): Create the 1000 words of content

Phase 2 ($10): Upload the 1000 word article to the clients web site and optimize 

Phase 3 ($10): Create the 400 word Press Release

Phase 4 ($10): Upload the 400 word Press Release to the clients web site and optimize 

If you decide to do all 4 phases of the project, we pay a bonus of $45 (Total= $100 for this project if you complete all 4 phases).  We prefer that our writers do all 4 phases, however, we are open to having you do phase by phase as well. Please note that the bonus is subject to a review of your work.   If you submit low quality work and you need help with uploading the article, — need teaching with SEO, the bonus is not paid.  We pay the bonus to contractors that are self starters, and know what to do (get it right the first time without much supervision). 

My Answer

Are you kidding me?!

This company wants you to write a 1,000-word (themed content) SEO article; a press release; and they want you to upload it to the client’s site – all for $100 – IF your work is up to par. And, there were other extensive guidelines you had to adhere to to complete this job. 

Again, are you kidding me?!

No, no, no, no, no – I would under no circumstances even consider this freelance writing job. 

I Can’t Tell You When to Accept or Turn Down SEO Writing Jobs, But . . .

Some content writing job requirements are so outrageously ridiculous that it’s cut and dried. This is one of those. 

FYI, at my SEO writing company (NewMediaWords.biz), we charge $195 to write a press release;  for an “easy, breezy” SEO article of 350-400 words, the cost is $45. For a 1,000 word article, the cost would be double plus. To upload content, we charge $45/hour (this falls under our General Editorial Services guidelines).

So right there, what they want to pay $100 for, we’re at around $330 at my firm. And, my company’s rates are cheap compared to many other firms. For example, press releases usually start at around $350 – just for the writing. This doesn’t include distribution. So I just want to remind you to value your time.

I don’t like to get into telling SEO copywriters what to charge, ie, what’s too little, what’s too much, etc., because my motto is, if you can afford to work for “x”, then who am I to say you shouldn’t. 

But again, some clients are ridiculous in what they want to pay. Your time would be better spent marketing for better-paying work.

Clients like this one may give you lots of work (and most times, it’s not nearly as much as they promise), but you become so overwhelmed that you don’t have the time or energy to look for better-paying SEO writing jobs. 

Also, many times these types of clients get a big project and they hold out the “we have lots of work for you” carrot so they can get a project done. Then once the project is done, they have no more work for you. So in essence, you’ve worked for a ridiculously low wage hoping that – at least – it will be an ongoing thing; ie, money you can count on. BUT after a few weeks, there is no more work and you never hear from the company again.

Furthermore, you might have problems getting paid from companies like this. The reason I say this is, it’s always a red flag for me when a company uses wording like:

Please note that the bonus is subject to a review of your work.   If you submit low quality work and you need help with uploading the article, — need teaching with SEO, the bonus is not paid.

Red flag, red flag, red flag!

I wrote a post back in January addressing this very issue, eg, when to turn down SEO writing jobs from clients who promise “lots of work.” So just be careful.

Remember, time is your biggest asset as a freelance writer. Use it wisely. Sometimes, the best use of your time is turning down an SEO writing job and marketing for better-paying work.  

Share Your Thoughts 

Would you accept this assignment? Why/why not? Under what circumstances do you normally turn down SEO writing jobs? Please share in the comments section below.

Coming Next Week: Cold Calling Carol Update

In the last post in this series, she told me that she had her first $1,000 day. Today, she sent me another update (which I’ll post next week) telling me that she’s expecting a $3,500 pay day. Stay tuned!

Yuwanda
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SEO Content Writing: How to Cite Sources in Web / SEO Articles

Recently, I received a question I’ve never been asked before about SEO content writing; it asked how to cite sources. Ironically enough, this was an issue I’ve never been asked about from clients – until a few weeks ago. A client sent me the following email on 2/27; he wrote:

QUESTION FROM ONE OF MY CLIENTS ABOUT STATS I USED IN AN SEO ARTICLE

Hey Yuwanda,

You wrote some content for me a few weeks back. We got the content placed [site was listed]. The site owner is asking for links to cite some of the data used in the article. Do you happen to know where you grabbed some of the data points? ie, Approximately 40% of attacks on . . .

Kind Regards,
KK

MY ANSWER

K-:

That was a widely cited stat I found in numerous places on the web. This was the main source, which was a direct quote from a company rep: [link to source was given]. It was also confirmed in another study here: [link to source was given]. (see page 7).

I attributed the stat to [well-known industry organization was listed] though because most know (and trust) the name of that firm. The stat can also be found in the following articles [links to two articles was given].

Hope this info helps.
###

Note: I always save the sources I use in client articles. Even though I’m rarely asked to provide “evidence” of where I got certain stats/info from, I’m able to easily do so if a client asks. 

FYI, another reason to save your research is that if a client becomes a repeat client (as this one is), they may ask you to write on the same subject matter again (again, as this client has). So, I often used some of the same research on numerous occasions. This cuts down on the amount of time it takes me to write an article, which increases my hourly rate.

Bottom line: Always, always, always save your research.

SEO Content Writing: Why Citing Sources in Articles Is Important

As an aside, I think clients are getting more particular about the content they place on their sites because of the Google Panda update (and other updates Google has done since then). This is a good thing because it means more work for quality SEO writers. Why/how?

You see, one of the things that came out of the Panda update was some SEO writing guidelines that Google uses to rank sites. FYI, Google hasn’t outright admitted that it uses these criteria to rank sites; it explains these guidelines in the following manner: 

The company [Google] is careful to note that it’s not disclosing actual ranking signals used in its algorithms, but these [23] questions will help you “step into Google’s mindset.” These questions are things that Google says it asks itself as it writes algorithms.

The bottom line is – the aim is to improve the overall quality of content on sites. And, this is why things like citing sources in SEO articles is important. It shows that research has indeed been done.

Now, to the email I received from a fellow SEO writer. She wrote . . .

QUESTION FROM AN SEO WRITER ABOUT CITING SOURCES 

Dear Yuwanda,

I was delighted to discover “5 Elements Samples that Land Freelance Writing Jobs Must Have“. It’s very helpful!

What’s the best way to cite sources in a sample article? Should the citation be complete & shown in brackets within the text (example 1 below)? Should it be briefer, and written so that it’s actually part of the text (sample 2)? Or should citations just be listed at the end (sample 3), with or without footnotes?

Also, do you include citations when counting words?

Warm thanks for all your help,
~F

1. Narcissistic Personality Disorder (NPD) is one of about a dozen such disorders recognized by mental health professionals. [Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th edition, p. 623] NPD is characterized by what clinicians call “grandiosity”–that is, an exaggerated sense of one’s own importance, power, and/or perfection. The grandiosity may appear in the person’s fantasies (“Soon I will be recognized as the star I was born to be”), his behavior (casually sacrificing the interests of others to his own convenience), or both. [Christopher Stave, ‘Personality Disorders’, JAMA, vol. 6 June issue, http://www.PubMedURL.org, accessed 2/2/12]
—————————–

2. According to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Narcissistic Personality Disorder (NPD) is one of about a dozen such disorders recognized by mental health professionals. NPD is characterized by what clinicians call “grandiosity”–that is, an exaggerated sense of one’s own importance, power, and/or perfection. As expert Dr. Christopher Stave explains, grandiosity may appear in the person’s fantasies (“Soon I will be recognized as the star I was born to be”), his behavior (casually sacrificing the interests of others to his own convenience), or both. [‘Personality Disorders’, http://www.PubMedURL.org]
——————————–

3. Narcissistic Personality Disorder (NPD) is one of about a dozen such disorders recognized by mental health professionals. NPD is characterized by what clinicians call “grandiosity”–that is, an exaggerated sense of one’s own importance, power, and/or perfection. The grandiosity may appear in the person’s fantasies (“Soon I will be recognized as the star I was born to be”), his behavior (casually sacrificing the interests of others to his own convenience), or both.

sources: Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th edition, p. 623
Christopher Stave, MD, ‘Personality Disorders’, JAMA, vol. 6 June issue, http://www.PubMedURL.org, accessed 2/2/12

 MY ANSWER 

F:
 
It all depends on the type of text you’re writing. Usually, #3 is the way I list them.
 
FYI, it’s very, very rare (unless you’re doing something like AMA writing) that you’ll have to list sources as most clients don’t want you to write text that requires a reader to click away from their site. So I usually refer to the organization by name in my article and leave it up to the reader to find the source of my stat, quote, etc.

So, if I’m writing a real estate article for example and I want to use a statistic from the NAR (National Association of Realtors), I’ll say something like, “According to a 2011 survey by the National Association of Realtors, 40 percent of new home buyers . . .” This way, you’ve given the source (hence given credibility to your writing sample). If the reader wants to do more digging, they have a starting point. 

NOTE: I DO save all sources from which i quote stats [as mentioned above]; that way if a client questions where I got the information, I can forward it to them (this happened to me just a couple of weeks ago). I think it’s one of the only times I’ve ever been asked to forward info on where I got certain statistics.
 
See what I mean?
 
Hope this helps.

CITING SOURCES IN SEO CONTENT WRITING: A DEFINITIVE SOURCE TO CONSULT

FYI, this is a good reference to refer to on how to cite sources when writing web / SEO content in general.

Again, this is not something I’d be overly concerned with. As I told this SEO writer, it’s very, very rare that you’ll be asked to cite sources (especially in any particular style or format). But, if it does happen, at least you’ll know what to do.

Have you ever been asked by a client to cite sources in a web article? How did you do it? What guidelines did you follow? Please share in the comments section below.

Hope you’re having a good week.

Yuwanda
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SEO Content Theft: What to Do When Someone Steals Your Writing Samples

I’ve been getting a lot of emails lately from writers (ebook authors, freelance writers) about content theft. The most recent one is from a new SEO writer, who wrote:

Yuwanda,
 
Hello I have great news… I got my first client yesterday and am working on my first few assignments. I also have some bad news. For some reason I got a hunch that I should check my work b/c I sent some samples off and didn’t receive feedback so I wanted to see if someone had lifted my samples.
 
I didn’t see the non-published samples on Copyscape. But I checked one of my published articles from ezinearticles.com and at least 18 other sites/people jacked my stuff! Some replaced a few words here and there but I know it is mine b/c of the personality in the pieces-it’s mine. I am so frustrated by this.
 
I added a by-line that stated this article may be printed in full with the following–and included my information. Not one of the sites I checked had my name under the articles. One person just took a whole paragraph and posted it on a forum like it was their idea.
 
Yuwanda, I know this must have happened to you in the past. Can you please tell me what I can do to prevent this and what I can do to reclaim-if possible my content?
 
Thanks a million and I do greatly appreciate all that you do.
 
P.S. I am excited to be working and getting paid from writing SEO articles. I see that I need to be more active on forums, social media and so forth to show I know what I’m talking about and not let the people who stole my content word-for-word benefit from my work. Again, love ya and thanks.

MY ANSWER

First, let me say, this is going to happen so you must get used to it. I’m not saying take it lying down, but try not to let it affect you too much. I find stolen content of mine all the time. And it is frustrating. But, I take comfort in the fact that thieves don’t prosper much.

Why Stealing Content Is an Unprofitable Business Model

The reason people steal is because they’re lazy and are always looking for an easy buck. There is no “easy” way to make money online. You have to be invested in the process; putting in blood, sweat and tears to make a business work. This comes across in content that a website owner posts.

Readers can sense sincerity. So, if someone is stealing content – sure, that one piece may be great, but there won’t be any continuity, no OVERALL sincerity. Hence, no customer loyalty is built, which means sales are few, if any.  This means the site owner will eventually be on to the next “make money online quick” scheme. 

How do I know this? Because I’m a legitimate online business owner who writes all of my content from first-hand experience. And I can tell you that some days sales suck! Even with hundreds of pages of content; over 25 years of experience (I’ve been in publishing since 1987 and a freelance writer since 1993); multiple websites; dozens of ebooks; thousands of social media followers; and a great online reputation (just Google my name); it still takes getting up and putting in the WORK to make a living.

So the fact that some thief comes along and steals a few of my articles to post on their website doesn’t bother me as much as it used to because I know that they’re not making any money. BECAUSE they’re not putting in the work.

Anyone who reads content on InkwellEditorial.com has no doubt that I know what I’m talking about because I am a freelance writer. I can speak about what it’s like to work with clients, how to set freelance writing rates, how to hire outsourcers, etc.

I don’t have to steal content to fill up my site because I “walk the walk” and “talk the talk” of a freelance writer. Thieves don’t.

Content Theft: 5 Specific Actions You Can Take If It Happens to You  

You can do a few things:

1. Contact the Site Owner: In my experience, this will work about 35-40% of the time. When I contact site owners, I give them 24 hours to remove the content. I also let them know that I’ve “tagged” their site to check regularly and that if I find another instance of theft, I will not contact them again, but will immediately contact their host company (and payment processor, and monetization source, etc. (as discussed below)).

2. Contact Their Host Company: Go to WhoIs.com and type in the site URL (eg, ABCSite.com). It will tell you who the host company for that site is.

3. File a DMCA Notice: This is an excellent post that details how to file a DMCA notice. It’s very easy. This post also details other actions you can take when you find that someone has stolen your content, like the following.

4. Hit’em in the Pocketbook: For example, if their site is monetized with Google AdSense ads, then contact Google. This can get their account closed – forever.

5. Contact Their Payment Processor:  Eg, PayPal, AlertPay, etc. Send them the same information in your DMCA notice letting the payment processor know that the site is using stolen content to promote their products. Hence, you’re requesting that no further payments be processed unless/until the disputed content is taken down. 

FYI, I’d file the DMCA notice first, then take the other actions.

One Thing You Should Know about Content Theft 

The freelancer who sent this email wrote, “Some replaced a few words here and there but I know it is mine b/c of the personality in the pieces-it’s mine.” 

Sometimes, people will rewrite your content. I don’t like it when this happens, but I’m less angry when it’s done IF proper credit is given to me. When you place articles on redistribution sites like EzineArticles.com, some website owners will rewrite/reword the content to make it unique to their site. This has happened a lot since Google’s Panda Update.

 Again, this is ok with me – IF they still give me credit for the article.

I just wanted to make this distinction.

Content Theft: Just How Rampant Is It?

How big of a problem is content theft? I did a quick web search, and following is just one of my articles that have been stolen.

Why SEO Copywriting is the Perfect High-Paying, Work-from-Home Job With Huge Growth Potential: I submitted this article to EzineArticles.com on August 21, 2008. It’s been stolen hundreds of times. Just do a web search of the title and see how many times it pops up – with no credit given to me.

As I said, content theft is going to happen. And the more you do business online and the more content you put out, the more it’s going to happen.

Following are some related discussions on copyright infringement, content theft and ebook theft that you may find insightful.

Do you have any more tips to add to prevent content theft? Please share in the comments section below.

Hope your week is going well!

Yuwanda
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3 SEO Copywriting Tips that Can Help You Land More Freelance Writing Jobs from Existing Clients

This past weekend, I received an email from a site reader asking about freelance writing courses. She wanted advice on a course that could teach her “different types” of writing. Her exact email was:

I’m interested in taking a freelance writing course that teaches me the structure of the different types of writing that I will need to do for potential clients. Does your course include how to actually write the SEO articles and other forms of writing? Please let me know. Thank you.

My Answer

My response to her was the following:

InkwellEditorial.com offers two freelance writing courses. The general one doesn’t discuss how to actually write — it assumes you have these skills, but don’t know where/how to start. So, this course teaches you everything you need to know to get set up as a freelance writer.

The SEO writing ecourse teaches you everything you need to know to start an SEO writing career, INCLUDING how to write this type of copy.

FYI, it’s up to you to determine which type of writing you want to do as a freelance writer. I know of no course that’s going to teach you how to do “different types” of writing.

There are just too many different types for any kind of writing course to be this inclusive. Hence, you have to decide which type of writing services you want to offer, eg, case studies, white papers, SEO articles, press releases, etc., then find courses that teach those specific types of writing. This is just one reason I advise freelancers — especially those who are just starting out — to niche it. You can always expand as you gain more experience (and skill).

“So,” you may be wondering, “what does this have to do with landing more freelance writing jobs?” Well it inspired this post; the part that got my brain to ticking was the two words, “different types” because I thought to myself:

No matter what type of content you offer as a freelance writer, you can always use your writing skill to get more work from a client.

Following are three ways to go about it.

Tip #1: Repurpose Existing Content

As there are so many different types of writing, whatever type of writing you do, you can recycle it for your clients so that they get more mileage out of it. For example, if a client asks you to complete a project – whether it’s a press release or a case study or some SEO articles – always offer to repurpose that content; especially if they commission offline copy.

So much of business is done online these days that if a client isn’t maximizing their website, they’re missing a lot of business. So you can repurposes SEO articles into press releases; newsletters into shorter blog posts, or sales letters into brochures.

And, repurposing is easy because once you take on the initial project, usually, all the research you need to complete an additional piece of content has been done already.

Tip #2: SEO Existing Content

Many companies are just hopping on the SEO bandwagon. But, they may have content on their websites that go back years. I know I do; between this site, InkwellEditorial.com and it’s old blog at InkwellEditorial.blogspot.com, I have close to 1,000 pages of content.

I was doing some research for another article that required me to go back and count how many blog posts I’d done since I started blogging in 2005. Following is roughly how it shakes out. Note: I say “roughly” because some pages are ebooks that I’ve uploaded, not actual “posts.”

I started blogging in February of 2005. That year, I wrote 58 posts.

In 2006, 103 posts;

In 2007; 168 posts;

In 2008, 164 posts;

in 2009, 85 posts (47 posts for this site and 38 for SeoWritingJobs.com);

In 2010, 174 posts (114 posts for this site; 51 for SeoWritingJobs.com; and 9 for Internet Marketing for Novices (my affiliate marketing newsletter));

In 2011, 204 posts (129 posts for this site; 62 for SeoWritingJobs.com; and 13 for Internet Marketing for Novices); and

So far this year, 14 posts for iw.com; 9 for SeoWritingJobs.com; and 3 for Internet Marketing for Novices.

I didn’t start “SEOing” my content in earnest until 2008/2009. Why? Because even though I learned about SEO writing in 2007, I was doing a lot of writing for clients, so SEOing my content wasn’t top of mind. While I make a conscious effort to do it when I write articles for article marketing, I still don’t pay as much attention as I could to it for my own content (eg, like this blog post).

That’s because usually I’m answering questions from readers, so my focus is answering the question, not SEOing my response.

What Does Rewriting Existing Content with SEO in Mind Entail

What would this entail? Things like:

Modifying site headings to include relevant keyword phrases;

Renaming image files (eg, from .jp1 to “titanium-wedding-bands.jpg (if it’s a site that sells this type of merchandise);

Including relevant, keyword-rich subheadings on each web page; and

Renaming pages (with a redirect from the old page), to name a few.

Offer to rewrite a certain number of pages for a fixed rate or a per-page rate as some pages will require only a few changes, while others may need more work. Many clients get nervous with an hourly rate; charging like this will give them a concrete figure to work with, which will make it easier for them to give you the job.

Note: If you want to target new clients, this is an excellent pitch to make, especially to small business owners and internet marketing firms. Why?

Small business owners tend to know very little about SEO. But, what they may know is that their site is underperforming. Hence, you can land rewriting jobs by explaining to them how they can get more targeted traffic by having their content written with SEO in mind.

Internet marketing firms have a lot of work because their customers are business owners – from small mom and pops to multi-million dollar companies. And, much of what they do for these businesses is rewrite content with SEO in mind.

********************************
Editor Note: Did you catch this recent post on InkwellEditorial.com, this site’s sister site — How to Write an Ebook: Answers to Frequently Asked Questions about Self-Publishing?
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Tip #3: Use Blog Comments to Create More Content

One of the struggles many businesses have (and writers too!) is creating interesting, informative content – on a daily/weekly basis.

An easy way to get around this is to look at a client’s blog to see which topics are hot. They’re usually the ones with the most comments. If a client doesn’t have a blog, ask them which pages get the most traffic on their sites.

Then, look over this content to create more similar to it.

Conclusion

We are smack dab in the middle of the age of information / content marketing. Proof? According to the October 2011 article, Why Content Marketing Is King, on Entrepreneur.com:

. . . 82 percent of B2B marketers now employ content marketing as a strategy in their marketing programs. Coming in at a distant second place is search engine marketing at 70 percent, followed by events at 68 percent, public relations at 64 percent and print/TV/radio advertising at 32 percent.

And, just what are the reasons many businesses cite for not doing content marketing? The same article states:

Nearly 70 percent of content curators say lack of time hinders their efforts, with 66 percent saying a lack of original and quality content is a major drawback. Another 38 percent say difficulty in measuring results is the stumbling block and 37 percent say lack of staff to do the work is the hindrance.

What does this mean?

In short, a wealth of opportunity for freelance writers, and particularly SEO writers. Are you prepared to seize the opportunities?

Yuwanda
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Freelance Advice: A Prospective Freelancer Asks, “Should I Start an SEO Writing Business If I’m Not Much of a Writer?”

Yesterday, I received the following email from a prospective SEO writer. He wrote:

Mrs. [sic] Black,
 
I am interested starting an SEO writing business, however, I don’t consider myself much of a writer. My writing experience is limited to responding to customer inquiries for a credit card company. I have very little college education on the subject, and have always had a love/hate relationship with it. I agonize over the phrasing and find myself spending a great deal of time rereading and rewriting.
 
Would you consider starting an SEO writing business someone like me could succeed in? My main concern is getting an article request and finding myself way over my head.

My Answer

My advice to this person would be, “Don’t start an SEO writing (or any other kind of freelance writing) business. Following is why.

This potential freelancer actually has good writing skills, just judging by his short email to me. And, he states that he does write regularly (eg, responding to customer inquiries for a credit card company). So the basic writing skills are there. 

The reason I say he shouldn’t start this type of career is his statement, “I have very little college education on the subject, and have always had a love/hate relationship with it.” [emphasis added]

To reiterate, you don’t need a formal education of any kind to become an SEO writer. In fact, one of the beautiful things about starting this type of freelance business is that age, education and experience don’t present barriers of entry. This tends to be true for web writing in general, by the way, compared to say, writing for newspapers  — where experience (and who you know) counts to some degree. 

I’ve said on many occasions that I don’t exactly like to write. BUT, I like the lifestyle that it allows me to lead and writing has always come relatively easy to me. A long-time entrepreneur, I’‘m also quite disciplined when it comes to meeting deadlines. All of this compensates for the fact that writing is not a “passion” for me.

Writing is damn hard work (and don’t believe anyone who tells you differently); especially if you have to write on subjects you know nothing about, have no interest in, and could care less about learning about. This will happen a lot in SEO writing.

Types of Projects to Expect as an SEO Writer 

I’ve written on everything from wire jewelry, to cake toppers, to roofing – all in one day. If you care nothing about these subjects, are not disciplined enough to get the work done and/or find yourself “spending a great deal of time rereading and rewriting,” SEO writing would be a tortuous career for you.

Related Post: Types of Projects to Expect as an SEO Writer

On the one hand, if you are disciplined, have good writing skills, appreciate the freedom of working for yourself and the money you can make – in spite of not LIKING to write – SEO writing could be the ideal career for you. In fact, the fact that I can write on so many different topics in one day is what keeps me from going batty some days!

I also happen to love quiz shows like Jeopardy, so learning random facts in the course of the research I do for client projects is fun. As these things underscore, like anything in life, these are the tradeoffs.

I think many wannabe freelancers get enamored with the “glamour” of freelancing – so much so that they forget about the actual work. Trust me, there’s nothing glamorous about it. It’s you, your laptop and research, which consists of digging through materials like white papers, surveys, case studies, university stats, etc. to find  pertinent facts.

That being said, I love my life – I wouldn’t trade it for anything in the world, even though I could probably double my income immediately by taking a job in corporate america.

But . . .

Would I trade working in my pjs (which I’m doing right now) for it;

Would I trade being able to travel at the drop of a hat for it;

Would I trade being able to set my own hours for it; 

Would I trade the freedom of doing what I want, when I want (for the most part) day in and day out for it?

No! 

So, even though I’m not passionate about writing – as many freelancers are – I am DISCIPLINED about it BECAUSE I realize the lifestyle it affords me. 

One Thing I’ve Learned about Freelancing Over the Years

There are very few of us who get to do EXACTLY what we love and make a real living doing it.

Years ago in New York, I tried my hand at acting. I got out because I hated not having control (when one casting director told me my ear lobes were uneven, that about did it for me). I mean, who has control over how their ear lobes are set!

I tried quite a few businesses over the years, and once I found what I do now – freelancing writing, self-publishing ebooks and internet marketing – I felt “at home.” I knew that this would be my last business.

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How to Tell If a Freelance Business Is Right for You

In my opinion, a business has to suit your personality. I like freelancing writing and self-publishing and internet marketing because when it comes to work, I’m basically a loner. In my personal life and socially, I couldn’t be more outgoing. But as a professional, I don’t like “teams.” I like to be given a project, a deadline and then be left alone to do it. And, that’s basically the way I work day in and day out. 

As an SEO writer, that’s what you’ll be doing day in and day out – getting orders from clients, a deadline within which to complete that project, and then be left alone to get the work done. 

So, before deciding on any type of freelance business, ask yourself the following questions:

Do I have the skills necessary to start this business?

Does it fit my working personality? 

And be honest. There’s no crime in NOT liking a business – even if it is a good way to make money because if you don’t like it, then you won’t do what’s necessary to be a success at it (ie, market, hone skills, meet deadlines, etc.). 

As always, I hope this insight helps.

Have a great weekend. For the first time in a couple of months, I actually have nothing on tap – and I’m looking forward to doing just that . . . nothing!

Yuwanda
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